Book of the month

Book of the month

British Crime Book of the Month – June 2017

A destructive private investigator and his eccentric coworkers handle cases so high-profile that they never make the headlines.Ravi Chandra Singh is the last guy you'd expect to become a private detective. A failed religious scholar, he now works for Golden Sentinels, an upmarket London private investigations agency. The first in a fun, topical London-based detective series. 

General Fiction Book of the Month – June 2017

WINNER BAILEYS PRIZE 2017! All over the world women are discovering they have the power. With a flick of the fingers they can inflict terrible pain – even death. Suddenly, every man on the planet finds they've lost control. The Day of the Girls has arrived – but where will it end?  –  'Electrifying’ – Margaret Atwood 'A big, page-turning, thought-provoking thriller’ – Guardian 

British Crime Book of the Month – May 2017

1919: The Derbyshire village of Wenfield is still reeling from four terrible years of war, and now, just when the village is coming to terms with the loss of so many of its sons, the brutal murder of a young girl shatters its hard-won tranquillity. Imagine a plot as devious as anything Agatha Christie devised, locate it in a Derbyshire village in 1919 and with writing as close to the pulse as Vera Brittain’s Testament of Youth and you will have some idea of the extraordinary power of Kate Ellis’s new novel.

General Fiction Book of the Month – May 2017

When the meaning of 'home' is complicated, we strive for a sense of connection. Yet sometimes being alone feels like the easiest choice to make. Written with startling beauty and power, Harmless Like You explores the complexities of identity and art and captures, over decades and cities, a fractured family narrative of love, loneliness and reconciliation.  

British Crime Book of the Month – April 2017

Samson O’Brien has been dismissed from the police force, and returns to his hometown of Bruncliffe in the Yorkshire Dales to set up the Dales Detective Agency while he fights to clear his name. However, the people of Bruncliffe aren’t that welcoming to a man they see as trouble.

General Fiction Book of the Month – April 2017

An evocative coming of age journey across 60s America. This beautifully written debut novel would not be out of place alongside the work of Steinbeck and Philipp Meyer’s American Rust. Mark Thompson’s Dust is at turns funny, and at others heart-achingly sad, the story unfolds around the honest and frequently irreverent observations of two young people trying to grow up fast in a world that is at times confusing, and at others seen with a clarity only the young may possess.

British Crime Book of the Month – March 2017

After thirty years at St Oswald’s Grammar in North Yorkshire, Latin master Roy Straitley has seen all kinds of boys come and go – the clowns, the rebels, the underdogs, and those he calls his Brodie boys. But every so often there’s a boy who doesn’t fit the mould. A troublemaker. A boy capable of twisting everything around him. A boy with hidden shadows inside. A boy who even twenty years on haunts his teacher’s dreams. A boy capable of bad things. The impressively versatile Joanne Harris is in Different Class in her psychological thriller mode, at her darkest and most unsettling. A magnificently plotted and twisty journey to the heart of a 24-year-old crime...

General Fiction Book of the Month – March 2017

Even a goldfish can dream of adventure… From his enviable view from a balcony on the 27th floor of an apartment block, Ian the Goldfish has frequent – if fleeting – desires for a more exciting life. Until one day, a series of unfortunate events give him an opportunity to escape… Our story begins, however, with the human inhabitants of Ian’s building. And as Ian tumbles perilously downwards, he will witness all their lives, loves, triumphs and disasters… Fishbowl by Bradley Somer is our general fiction Book of the Month. A truly original, philosophically joyful and charming novel with the unlikeliest of heroes. This is Tales of the City as seen by a goldfish.

Book of the month for February

Jem Lester – Shtum is our book of the month for February. Ben Jewell has hit breaking point. His ten-year-old son, Jonah, has never spoken.So when Ben and Jonah are forced to move in with Ben's elderly father, three generations of men - one who can't talk; two who won't – are thrown together. As Ben battles single fatherhood, a string of well-meaning social workers and his own demons, he learns some difficult home truths. Jonah, blissful in his ignorance, becomes the prism through which all the complicated strands of personal identity, family history and misunderstanding are finally untangled.

British Crime Book of the month – February

Jackie Kabler – The Dead Dog Day is our british crime book of the month for February. When your Monday morning begins with a dead dog and ends with a dead boss, you know it's going to be one of those days. And breakfast TV reporter Cora Baxter has already had the weekend from hell, after the man she'd planned a fabulous future with unceremoniously dumped her. Now Cora's much-hated boss has been murdered - the list of suspects isn't exactly short, but as the enquiry continues the trail leads frighteningly close to home. Why is Cora's rival, glamorous, bitchy newsreader Alice Lomas, so devastated by their boss's death? What dark secrets are Cora's camera crew hiding? And why has her now ex-boyfriend vanished? The race to stop the killer striking again is on...
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