Books of the month for September

General Fiction: Paul Beatty – Sellout

British Crime: David Ashton Mistress of the Just Land

Tough Crime: Neal Griffin – Benefit of the Doubt

Fantasy: James A. Moore – Seven Forges

Science Fiction: Bennett Coles – Virtues of War

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Jonathan Wood – No Hero (#1)

Teen reading: Sophie Kinsella – Finding Audrey

Classic of the Month: Sinclair Lewis – It Can't Happen Here

Non-Fiction: Margaret Forster – My Life in Houses

 

Paul Beatty – SelloutDavid Ashton - Mistress of the Just Land: A Jean Brash Mystery 1Neal Griffin – Benefit of the Doubt James A. Moore – Seven ForgesBennett Coles – Virtues of WarJonathan Wood – No Hero (#1)Sophie Kinsella – Finding AudreySinclair Lewis – It Can't Happen HereMargaret Forster – My Life in Houses

Paul Beatty – Sellout

General Fiction: Paul Beatty – Sellout

Longlisted for Man Booker Prize 2016.

Born in Dickens on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles, the narrator of The Sellout spent his childhood as the subject in his father's racially charged psychological studies. He is told that his father's work will lead to a memoir that will solve their financial woes. But when his father is killed in a drive-by shooting, he discovers there never was a memoir. All that's left is a bill for a drive-through funeral.

What's more, Dickens has literally been wiped off the map to save California from further embarrassment. Fuelled by despair, the narrator sets out to right this wrong with the most outrageous action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in the Supreme Court.

David Ashton - Mistress of the Just Land: A Jean Brash Mystery 1

British Crime: David Ashton – Mistress of the Just Land: A Jean Brash Mystery 1

New Year’s Day – and through the misty streets of Victorian Edinburgh an elegant, female figure walks the cobblestones – with a certain vengeful purpose.
Jean Brash, the Mistress of the Just Land, brings her cool intelligence to solving a murder, a murder that took place in her own bawdy-house (the best in Edinburgh and her pride and joy).
A prominent judge, strangled and left dangling, could bring her whole life to ruin and she didn’t haul herself off the streets, up through low dirty houses of pleasure and violent vicious men – to let that come to pass. The search for the killers will take Jean back into her own dark past as she uncovers a web of political and sexual corruption in the high reaches of the Edinburgh establishment.
A young boy’s death long ago is demanding justice but, as the body count increases, she has little time before a certain Inspector James McLevy, comes sniffing round like a wolf on the prowl.
Jean may be on the side of natural justice but is she on the side of the law? Or will the law bring her down?

Neal Griffin – Benefit of the Doubt

Tough Crime: Neal Griffin – Benefit of the Doubt

Ben Sawyer was a big-city cop, until he nearly killed a helpless suspect in public. Now a detective in the tiny Wisconsin town where he and his wife grew up, Ben suspects that higher-ups are taking payoffs from local drug lords.

Before long, Ben is off the force. His wife is accused of murder. His only ally is another outcast, a Latina rookie cop. Worse, a killer has escaped from jail with vengeance on his mind, and Newburg-and Ben Sawyer-in his sights.

James A. Moore – Seven Forges

Fantasy: James A. Moore – Seven Forges

Seven Forges by James A. Moore, artwork by Alejandro ColucciThe people of Fellein have lived with legends for many centuries. To their far north, the Blasted Lands, a legacy of an ancient time of cataclysm, are vast, desolate and impassable, but that doesn’t stop the occasional expedition into their fringes in search of any trace of the ancients who once lived there… and oft-rumoured riches.

Captain Merros Dulver is the first in many lifetimes to find a path beyond the great mountains known as the Seven Forges and encounter, at last, the half‐forgotten race who live there. And it would appear that they were expecting him.

As he returns home, bringing an entourage of the strangers with him, he starts to wonder whether his discovery has been such a good thing. For the gods of this lost race are the gods of war, and their memories of that far-off cataclysm have not faded.

Bennett Coles – Virtues of War

Science Fiction: Bennett Coles – Virtues of War

The Terran military, the Astral Force, launches a mission to crush a colonial rebellion on the Centauri colony. Although Expeditionary Force 15 succeeds, the surviving veterans remain scarred—physically and emotionally, and the consequences of their actions follow them back to Earth when terrorists seek to exact catastrophic revenge.

Jonathan Wood – No Hero (#1)

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Jonathan Wood – No Hero (#1)

Oxford police detective Arthur Wallace asks himself that question a lot. Because Arthur is no hero. He's a good cop, but prefers that action and heroics remain on the screen, safely performed by professionals.But then, secretive government agency MI12 comes calling, hoping to recruit Arthur in their struggle against the tentacled horrors from another dimension known as the Progeny.

Sophie Kinsella – Finding Audrey

Teen reading: Sophie Kinsella – Finding Audrey

Audrey can't leave the house. she can't even take off her dark glasses inside the house.

Then her brother's friend Linus stumbles into her life. With his friendly, orange-slice smile and his funny notes, he starts to entice Audrey out again - well, Starbucks is a start.And with Linus at her side, Audrey feels like she can do the things she'd thought were too scary. Suddenly, finding her way back to the real world seems achievable.

Sinclair Lewis – It Can't Happen Here

Classic of the Month: Sinclair Lewis – It Can't Happen Here

A cautionary tale about the fragility of democracy, it is an alarming, eerily timeless look at how fascism could take hold in America. Written during the Great Depression, when the country was largely oblivious to Hitler’s aggression, it juxtaposes sharp political satire with the chillingly realistic rise of a president who becomes a dictator to save the nation from welfare cheats, sex, crime, and a liberal press.

Margaret Forster – My Life in Houses

Non-Fiction: Margaret Forster – My Life in Houses

As heard on BBC Radio 4 'I was born on May 25, 1938, in the front bedroom of a house in Orton Road, on the outer edges of Raffles, a council estate. I was a lucky girl.' So begins Margaret Forster's journey through the houses she's lived in, from that sparkling new council house, built as part of a utopian vision by Carlisle City Council, to her beloved London house of today, via Oxford, Hampstead, the Lake District and a spell in the Mediterranean. This is not a book about bricks and mortar, or about how a house becomes a home with the right scatter of cushions.This is a book about what houses are to us, the effect they have on the way we live our lives. It is also a wonderful backwards glace at the changing nature of our accommodation: from blacking grates and outside privies; to cities dominated by bedsits and lodgings; to houses today being converted back into single dwellings, all open-plan spaces and bringing the outside in. Finally, it is a gently insistent, personal inquiry into the meaning of home.

Developed in cooperation with:

Multimediaambassaden, Mats Rytther