Books of the month

Books of the month for September

General Fiction: Jill Alexander Essbaum – Hausfrau

British Crime: M. J. Carter – The Strangler Vine

Tough Crime: F. H. Batagan – Smaller and Smaller Circles

Science Fiction: Kieran Shea – Koko Takes a Holiday

Fantasy: Joshua Palmatier – Shattering the Ley (Trilogy Two #1)

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Jamie Schulz – Premonitions

Classic of the Month: Dashiell Hammett – Red Harvest

Teen reading: Jenn Bennett – Night Owls

Hausfrau - Jill Alexander EssbaumThe Strangler Vine - M J CarterF. H. Batagan – Smaller and Smaller CirclesKieran Shea – Koko Takes a HolidayJoshua Palmatier – Shattering the Ley (Trilogy Two #1)Jamie Schulz – PremonitionsDashiell Hammett – Red HarvestJenn Bennett – Night Owls

Books of the month for August

General Fiction: Roxanne Gay – Untamed State

British Crime: Quintin Jardine – Mathew's Tale

Tough Crime: Wiley Cash – This Dark Road to Mercy

Science Fiction: John Scalzi – Lock In

Fantasy: Ishbelle Bee – Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath: From the Peculiar Adventures of John Lovehar

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: M. L. Brennan – Generation V

Classic of the Month: Wilkie Collins – The Moonstone

Teen reading: Julie Mayhew The Big Lie

Roxanne Gay – Untamed StateQuintin Jardine – Mathew's TaleWiley Cash – This Dark Road to MercyJohn Scalzi – Lock InIshbelle Bee – Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath: From the Peculiar Adventures of John LoveharM. L. Brennan – Generation VWilkie Collins – The MoonstoneJulie Mayhew – The Big Lie

Books of the month for July

General Fiction: Peter Nichols – The Rocks

British Crime: Claire Mackintosh I Let You Go

Tough Crime: Lisa Brackmann – Rock Paper Tiger

Science Fiction: Danni Kollin, Eytan Kollin – Unincorporated Man (#1)

Fantasy: Chris Evans – Of Bone and Thunder

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: David B. CoeSpell Blind

Classic of the Month: Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird

Teen reading: Leah Thomas  Because You'll Never Meet Me

Peter Nichols – The RocksClaire Mackintosh – I Let You GoLisa Brackmann – Rock Paper TigerDanni Kollin, Eytan Kollin – Unincorporated Man (#1)Chris Evans – Of Bone and Thunder David B. Coe – Spell Blind Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird Leah Thomas – Because You'll Never Meet Me

Books of the month for June

General Fiction: Judy Chicurel – If I Knew You Were Going To Be This Beautiful, I Never Would Have Let You Go

British Crime: Frances Brody – Death of an Avid Reader (Kate Shackleton Mysteries #6)

Tough Crime: Bryan Quertermous – Murder Boy

Science Fiction: Charles Gannon – Fire with Fire

Fantasy: K. M. Mcinley – The Iron Ship

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Clay Griffith, Susan Griffith  Shadow Revolution (Crown & Key)

Classic of the Month: Flann O'Brien – Third Policeman

Teen reading: Steve Brezenoff – Guy in Real Life

Judy Chicurel – If I Knew You Were Going To Be This Beautiful, I Never Would Have Let You Go Frances Brody – Death of an Avid Reader (Kate Shackleton Mysteries #6) Bryan Quertermous – Murder Boy Charles Gannon – Fire with FireK. M. Mcinley – The Iron ShipClay Griffith, Susan Griffith – Shadow Revolution (Crown & Key) Flann O'Brien – Third Policeman Steve Brezenoff – Guy in Real Life

Books of the month for May

General Fiction: Luke Brown – My Biggest Lie

British Crime: Mark Sanderson Robin Hood Yard

Tough Crime: Lou Berney – The Long and Faraway Gone

Science Fiction: Jane Lindskold – Artemis Awakening

Fantasy: S. Andrew Swann – Dragon Princess

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: John Birmingham – Emergence: Dave vs. the Monsters

Classic of the Month: Joseph ConradThe Secret Agent

Teen reading: Cammie McGovern Say What You Will

Luke Brown – My Biggest LieMark Sanderson – Robin Hood YardLou Berney – The Long and Faraway Gone Jane Lindskold – Artemis AwakeningS. Andrew Swann – Dragon PrincessJohn Birmingham – Emergence: Dave vs. the Monsters Joseph Conrad – The Secret AgentCammie McGovern – Say What You Will

Books of the month for April

General Fiction: Rufi Thorpe – The Girls From Corona del Mar

British Crime: Matthew Frank – If I Should Die

Tough Crime: Salar Abdoh – Tehran at Twilight

Science Fiction: Ursula K. Le Guin – The Left Hand of Darkness

Fantasy: Stephen Leigh – Immortal Muse

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Lynsay Sands – The Immortal Who Loved Me

Classic of the Month: William Shakespeare – Macbeth

Teen reading: Jandy Nelson – I'll Give You the Sun

Rufi Thorpe – The Girls From Corona del MarMatthew Frank – If I Should DieSalar Abdoh – Tehran at Twilight Ursula K. Le Guin – The Left Hand of DarknessStephen Leigh – Immortal MuseLynsay Sands – The Immortal Who Loved MeWilliam Shakespeare – MacbethJandy Nelson – I'll Give You the Sun

Books of the month for March

General Fiction: Laline Paull – The Bees

British Crime: Judith Flanders – A Murder of Magpies

Tough Crime: Yuri Herrera – Signs Preceding the End of the World

Science Fiction: Rjurik Davidson – Unwrapped Sky

Fantasy: Katherine Addison – The Goblin Emperor

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Diana Rowland – How the White Trash Zombie Got Her Groove Back

Classic of the Month: Charlotte Brontë – Villette

Teen reading: Lee Harper – To Kill A Mockingbird

Laline Paull – The BeesJudith Flanders – A Murder of MagpiesYuri Herrera – Signs Preceding the End of the WorldRjurik Davidson – Unwrapped SkyKatherine Addison – The Goblin EmperorDiana Rowland – How the White Trash Zombie Got Her Groove Back Charlotte Brontë – Villette Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Books of the month for February

General Fiction: Dinaw Mengestu – All Our Names

British Crime: Susan Elia MacNeal – Mr Churchill's Secretary (Maggie Hope #1)

Tough Crime: Edney Silvestre – Happiness is Easy

Science Fiction: Allen Steele – V-S Day

Fantasy: Marshall Ryan Maresca – The Thorn of Dentonhill (Maradaine #1)

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Anne Bishop – Written in Red (Others #1)

Classic of the Month: Aldous Huxley – Brave New World

Teen reading: Kate Hendrick – The Accident

Dinaw Mengestu – All Our NamesSusan Elia MacNeal – Mr Churchill's Secretary (Maggie Hope #1) Edney Silvestre – Happiness is Easy Allen Steele – V-S DayMarshall Ryan Maresca – The Thorn of Dentonhill (Maradaine #1) Anne Bishop – Written in Red (Others #1) Aldous Huxley – Brave New World Kate Hendrick – The Accident

Books of the month for January

General Fiction: Matt Haig – The Humans

British Crime: Ann Granger – The Testimony of the Hanged Man

Tough Crime: G. M. Ford – Chump Change (Leo Waterman #8)

Science Fiction: Jacey Bedford – Empire of Dust (Psi-Tech #1)

Fantasy: C. S. Friedman – Dreamwalker (#1)

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Karen Marie Moning – Iced (O'Malley #1)

Classic of the Month: Djuna Barnes – Nightwood

Teen reading: Jennifer Niven – All the Bright Places

The Humans by Matt HaigThe Testimony of the Hanged Man by Ann GrangerChump Change (Leo Waterman #8)  by G. M. FordEmpire of Dust (Psi-Tech #1) by Jacey BedfordDreamwalker (#1) by C. S. FriedmanIced (O'Malley #1) by Karen Marie MoningNightwood by Djuna BarnesAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Books of the month for November

Natalie Haynes – The Amber Fury

General Fiction: Natalie Haynes – The Amber Fury

When you open up, who will you let in? When Alex Morris loses her fiance in dreadful circumstances, she moves from London to Edinburgh to make a break with the past. Alex takes a job at a Pupil Referral Unit, which accepts the students excluded from other schools in the city. These are troubled, difficult kids and Alex is terrified of what she's taken on.

Jane Casey – The Kill

British Crime: Jane Casey – The Kill

A killer is terrorising London but this time the police are the targets. Urgently re-assigned to investigate a series of brutal attacks on fellow officers, Maeve Kerrigan and her boss Josh Derwent have little idea what motivates the killer's fury against the force. But they know it will only be a matter of time before the killer strikes again.

Alison Gaylin – And She Was...

Tough Crime: Alison Gaylin – And She Was...

Missing persons investigator Brenna Spector has a rare neurological disorder that enables her to recall every detail of every day of her life. A blessing and a curse, it began in childhood, when her older sister stepped into a strange car never to be seen again, and it’s proven invaluable in her work. But it hasn’t helped her solve the mystery that haunts her above all others—and it didn’t lead her to little Iris. When a local woman, Carol Wentz, disappears eleven years later, Brenna uncovers bizarre connections between the missing woman, the long-gone little girl … and herself.

Robert Charles Wilson – Burning Paradise

Science Fiction: Robert Charles Wilson – Burning Paradise

Cassie Klyne, nineteen years old, lives in the United States in the year 2015--but it's not our United States, and it's not our 2015. Cassie's world has been at peace since the Great Armistice of 1918. There was no World War II, no Great Depression. Poverty is declining, prosperity is increasing everywhere; social instability is rare. But Cassie knows the world isn't what it seems. Her parents were part of a group who gradually discovered the awful truth: that for decades--back to the dawn of radio communications--human progress has been interfered with, made more peaceful and benign, by an extraterrestrial entity. That by interfering with our communications, this entity has tweaked history in massive and subtle ways. That humanity is, for purposes unknown, being farmed. Cassie's parents were killed for this knowledge, along with most of the other members of their group. Since then, the survivors have scattered and gone into hiding. Cassie and her younger brother Thomas now live with her aunt Nerissa, who shares these dangerous secrets. Others live nearby. For eight years they have attempted to lead unexceptional lives in order to escape detection. The tactic has worked. Until now. Because the killers are back. And they're not human.

Wen Spencer – Eight Million Gods

Fantasy:  Wen Spencer – Eight Million Gods

A contemporary fantasy of mystery and death as American expats battle Japanese gods and monsters to retrieve an ancient artifact that can destroy the world.

On Saturday afternoon, Nikki Delany thought, "George Wilson, in the kitchen, with a blender." By dinner, she had killed George and posted his gory murder to her blog. The next day, she put on her mourning clothes and went out to meet her best friend for lunch to discuss finding a replacement for her love interest. …

Stephen Blackmoore – Broken Souls

Paranormal/Urban Fantasy: Stephen Blackmoore – Broken Souls

Sister murdered, best friend dead, married to the patron saint of death, Santa Muerte. Necromancer Eric Carter’s return to Los Angeles hasn’t gone well, and it’s about to get even worse.

His link to the Aztec death goddess is changing his powers, changing him, and he’s not sure how far it will go. He’s starting to question his own sanity, wonder if he’s losing his mind. No mean feat for a guy who talks to the dead on a regular basis.

While searching for a way to break Santa Muerte’s hold over him, Carter finds himself the target of a psychopath who can steal anyone’s form, powers, and memories. Identity theft is one thing, but this guy does it by killing his victims and wearing their skins like a suit. He can be anyone. He can be anywhere.

Now Carter has to change the game — go from hunted to hunter. All he has for help is a Skid Row bruja and a ghost who’s either his dead friend Alex or the manifestation of Carter’s own guilt-fueled psychotic break.

Everything is trying to kill him. Nothing is as it seems. If all his plans go perfectly, he might survive the week.

He’s hoping that’s a good thing.

E. M. Forster – Maurice

Classic of the Month: E. M. Forster – Maurice

Maurice Hall is a young man who grows up confident in his privileged status and well aware of his role in society. Modest and generally conformist, he nevertheless finds himself increasingly attracted to his own sex. Through Clive, whom he encounters at Cambridge, and through Alec, the gamekeeper on Clive's country estate, Maurice gradually experiences a profound emotional and sexual awakening.

A tale of passion, bravery and defiance, this intensely personal novel was completed in 1914 but remained unpublished until after Forster's death in 1970. Compellingly honest and beautifully written, it offers a powerful condemnation of the repressive attitudes of British society, and is at once a moving love story and an intimate tale of one man's erotic and political self-discovery.

Eleanor Updale – The Last Minute

Teen reading: Eleanor Updale – The Last Minute

9.21am: business as usual on a high street in England.

9.22am: the explosions are heard for miles around, and in the early confusion there is talk of a gas leak, a plane crash, and even terrorism .…

The people of Heathwick had been preparing for Christmas unaware that many would die, and the rest would be transformed for ever. Travel with them, second-by-second, through the hopes, fears, love, worries, gossip, cruelty, kindness and trivia that dominated their final minute before tragedy struck.

And in the everyday story of an ordinary street, look for clues to what happened, and why.

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Multimediaambassaden, Mats Rytther